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ISSN 1409-6900 | UDK 82+7     Blesok no. 32 | volume VI | May-June, 2003



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                     Peer-reviewed journal
Blesok no. 32May-June, 2003
Sound Reviews

Interview with Johnny Winter

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p. 1
Vasja Ivanovski

VI: Do you recall your musical beginnings and how did it all happen?
    JW:
I started playing ukulele first for 2 years from age 9 to 11 and got my first guitar and got inspired by blues I heard on the radio that turned me on and I started learning myself. When I got old enough to go to night clubs to hear that music at the age of 15.
    
    VI:
Was there any family music tradition in your house?
    JW:
My dad played banjo, sax and sang. My mother played piano so we always had music around the house.
    
    VI:
Beside Edgar, do you have any other brothers and sisters and if so, are Edgar and you the only ones involved in music?
    JW:
No other brothers and sisters, just Edgar and I.
    
    VI:
When did you become aware that music would be your future?
    JW:
I always wanted to play music and have it be my career and knew this by the age of 12.
    
    VI:
As far as I know your first recordings are more in rock vein than blues, correct?
    JW:
Yes, that’s true.
    
    VI:
You have managed to bring exposure of old blues masters to wide audiences by performing their usic, were you aware of that fact then?
    JW:
That was my intention and was aware that it was happening.
    
    VI:
Do you remember your first band and when was that?
    JW:
1959 and it was called Johnny And The Jamers.
    
    VI:
Who were your earliest influences in music?
    JW:
There were a whole lot, I bought every blues record I could find, it wasn’t just one or two people. My vocal influences were Ray Charles and Bobby Blue Bland.
    
    VI:
Who influenced your guitar style and why?
    JW:
T-Bone Walker was one that stood out and got me off.
    
    VI:
What’s your opinion on the current state of the blues and what can be expected in the future?
    JW:
I think it will always be around it just takes one person to make people aware of the blues.
    
    VI:
You have played all over the world, how do blues fans in various parts of  our planet react to your music?
    JW:
Everyone seems to like it.

VI: You have worked with many well known blues people, could you point out some interesting experiences?
    JW:
Working with Muddy Waters really wiped me out it was something I always wanted to do. It was a personal accomplishement I’m very proud of.






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